Usher In the Winter Solstice “Stonehenge” Style on Roswell

| No Comments

Join our Heatherton residents in their custom Sundial Maze (called the Heatherton Folly) at the community in Roswell, just off Holcomb Bridge Rd. The Winter Solstice hits at precisely 12:37pm when the sun casts the longest shadow of the year, and Harold Cunliffe the maze designer can tell you exactly how it all works. And it appears that our “Indian Summer” weather will leave us on Sunday soon after the solstice arrives!

WHAT — Hot chocolate or iced tea event (depending on the weather) to mark the Winter Solstice
WHEN — 12 – 1 p.m. on Sunday, December 21, 2008 (Winter Solstice is at 12:37 p.m.)
WHERE — In the Heatherton Folly, a maze with Stonehenge-style marker’s in Roswell’s Heatherton community, near GA 400 and Holcomb Bridge|
WHO — The event is open to the media and Heatherton residents. Harold Cunliffe of the Pacific Group and Joe Cunliffe, creators of the Heatherton Folly will be on hand for interviews.

PHOTO OPPORTUNITIES — With maze creator Harold Cunliffe as their guide, residents will observe the longest shadow of the year cast by the spires of the Heatherton Folly (weather permitting).

——————————————————————————–
“The Heatherton Folly” in Roswell, a park within Monte Hewett Homes’ Heatherton community in Roswell, uses shadows and stone markers to track time and the passage of seasons. Located near GA 400 and Holcomb Bridge Road, the Heatherton Folly is a maze consisting of two partially overlapping labyrinths. The smaller labyrinth ends at the Solstice Spire, whose shadow marks the winter and summer seasons. In addition to casting its longest shadow of the year, the spire will strike one of two black rocks just outside the maze with its shadow. The only other day of the year when the shadow hits these one of these rocks is at the Summer Solstice, the shortest night of the year and the time the spire casts its shortest shadow.

The second labyrinth ends at the larger Equinox Spire, whose shadow acts as a sundial and marks the Equinoxes. Developed by Harold Cunliffe of the Pacific Group, this civil engineering feat also marks Heatherton’s position on the earth, 84 degrees longitude and 34 degrees latitude, by the angular measurement between the stones that circle the two labyrinths. The maze element was designed by Joe Cunliffe, now 19 but then 14 years old, on a day off from school.

Directions: GA 400 North to exit 7, Holcomb Bridge Road. Go west and take a left onto Dogwood Road. Community is located at the top of the hill on the left.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.