Get Your Severe Weather Safety Plan Together

| No Comments

Be prepared and stay safe by using a severe weather safety plan.

With summer approaching and the potential for severe weather always a possibility, it’s important to have an emergency plan in place. Having a severe weather safety plan could be the difference between life and death. As we know all too well, thunderstorms and tornados can be very severe and crop up with only a short time for you and your family to prepare. You never know when disaster will strike. Follow these helpful tips to make sure you have a severe weather safety plan in place.

severe weather safety planThe most essential component to any severe weather safety plan is a disaster supply kit. You can gradually make a kit, but there are some common items that every household should have at all times such as water, working flashlights and batteries. A weather radio is also an important part of your emergency kit. In a severe storm your likely to lose satellite or cable, or even your power altogether. A weather radio will keep you up to date on the latest warnings and watches and will let you know when you need to take emergency shelter. They can be purchased at most electronics retailers or online and can truly save lives. Living in certain areas can definitely drive home specifics to your severe weather safety plan. For example, people living in the Midwest and Southeast regions should develop a personal tornado safety plan since those areas of the country are prone to tornados. However, people living in the Gulf Coast and along the East coast areas should develop a hurricane safety plan.

Check out the following helpful websites to learn more on how to be prepared for severe weather.

Ready from FEMA: http://www.ready.gov/severe-weather

Thunderstorm Safety: http://www.redcross.org/prepare/disaster/thunderstorm

Flood Safety: http://www.redcross.org/prepare/disaster/flood

Tornado: http://www.redcross.org/prepare/disaster/tornado

Power Outage Safety: http://www.redcross.org/prepare/disaster/power-outage

 

 

 

 

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.